Book of Fire

by Michelle Kenney

I didn’t know where this book would go when I started reading it: at first glance, it seemed like a traditional dystopia, with the world post-apocalypse, and the surviving humans split between the outsiders (who live in the forest) and those inside the Lifedome, a massive structure housing what is left of civilization. We follow Talia, an outsider, hunting and gathering for her family until the day her brother and grandfather are taken in a raid by those mysterious people inside the dome. And that’s when every expectation I had got thrown out of the window, and my mind was blown.

Summary

Life outside the domes is not possible. At least that’s what Insiders are told. Twins Eli and Talia shouldn’t exist. They’re Outsiders. 

Their home is a secret. Their lives are a secret. Arafel is a secret. 

An unexpected forest raid forces Talia into a desperate mission to rescue her family while protecting the sacred book of Arafel from those who would use it as a weapon. As Talia and her life long friend Max enter the dome, she makes some unexpected discoveries, and allies, in the form of rugged Insider August, that will change the course of her life forever. 

She’ll stop at nothing to save her family but will she sacrifice her heart in the process? 

Musings

Mild spoilers from here on out: if you don’t want to know what society is like under the dome, and would rather find out for yourself, head on over and start reading the book now. If you don’t mind having that spoiled for you, it’s what I found the most compelling with the book, and I’m going to rave about how awesome it is.

The dome was built before the downfall of humanity in order to house massive strides in bioengineering. It’s only logical that when the apocalypse came and mankind needed a place to ride it out, the elite got the better end of the deal, and the lower classes – let in by sheer pity and necessity for a labor force, à la Snowpiercer – got the sharp end of the stick. The new society is entirely ruled by the fundamentals of bioengineering, artificial selection, and genetic experimentation.

And the Roman empire. Because what cooler combination than modern day Romans trying to bring their myths back to life? If you enjoy Greek/Roman mythology, then you’re going to see it come alive in marvelous, terrible ways. The author’s abundant knowledge of Roman life and culture infuse the novel with a degree of realness that you can’t help but be drawn in.

On top of the cool premise, we have Talia, a headstrong main character with a massive love for her family (she reminds me a little of Katniss in the way she deals with disaster) and a secret that could end mankind if it ends up in the wrong hands. With the help of a mysterious knight named August, and her lifelong friend Max, Talia battles the cruel realities of the dome and its vicious despot, Octavia as she tries to rescue her brother and grandfather.

While the love triangle felt a little forced, I’m 100% team Taugust (is that a thing? it should be a thing) though someone should really tell August calling a girl ‘Feral Cat’ all the time isn’t as sweet as he thinks it is. Oh well.

This book is if The Isle of Doctor Moraux was crossed with Hunger Games but written by a Roman. It’s exciting, fun, and brilliantly clever. I cannot wait to read the sequel!

Published August 27th 2017 by HQ Digital
I want to thank author Michelle Kenny and Harper Collins for providing me with a wonderful review copy.

One thought on “Book of Fire

  1. JenLGilmour February 19, 2019 / 9:41 pm

    I am intrigued, thank you for sharing. I better find out about this love triangle now. x

    Like

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